Posts

Demo Sites for Blogdown-ified Hugo Themes

I tweaked a couple of simple Hugo themes for use by R-bloggers along with the blogdown package. If you prefer minimal themes you might wish to start with one of these.

Hosting on your Github User Page via Submodule

My primary technical blog is hosted by Github through my User repository (homerhanumat.github.io). Recently I switched my generator from Jekyll to Hugo. From the User repository Github Pages requires that the site be served from the root of the repository (not from docs). Jekyll allowed us to build the site into the root, but Hugo builds into a specific directory, named public by default. Building into the root would look a bit messy, anyway.

Installing the Addinplots Package

Notes for colleagues on installation of the addinplots package.

RStudio Addin Code-Helpers for Plotting

Describes my addinplots package, a set of GUIs in the R Studio IDE for the Lattice plotting system.

Notes on LaTeX Installation for R Studio

Notes on installation of LaTeX on the R Studio Server for rendering of R Markdown documents.

An Easy Start with Jekyll, for R-Bloggers

Some themings of Yihui Xie’s knitr-jekyll package. Now outmoded by the blogdown package.

A Tutorial on Writing Simulation Apps in Shiny

A tutorial on writing simulations apps in Shiny, itself in the form of a Shiny app.

Google Charts in R Markdown

Introduction An excellent little post (Zoom, zoom googleVis) showed up recently on R-Bloggers. The author Markus Gesmann is the maintainer of the googleVis package that links R to the Google Charts API. My first thought was: could I embed charts like those in R Markdown documents that could knit to ioslides or other formats suitable for use in my elementary statistics classes? A quick look at the documentation showed that it’s very easy indeed to do this sort of thing.

Five Reasons to Teach Elementary Statistics With R: #3

Introduction This is the third in a projected five-part series of posts aimed at colleagues who teach elementary statistics. If you teach with R but hesitate to spring such a powerful and complex tool on unsuspecting introductory students—many of whom whom will have had no prior experience with the command line, much less with coding—then I hope these posts will give you some encouragement. The previous post in this series described R Studio’s package manipulate and its applications in the easy authoring of instructional applets.

Five Reasons to Teach Elementary Statistics With R: #2

Introduction This is is second in a projected five-part series of posts aimed at colleagues who teach elementary statistics. If you teach with R but hesitate to spring such a powerful and complex tool on unsuspecting introductory students—many of whom whom will have had no prior experience with the command line, much less with coding—then I hope these posts will give you some encouragement. The first post in this series introduced package mosaic, and promised to review a supplementary package that I and a colleague put together for our own students, but I’ve decided put that off a bit and focus instead on another powerful new tool for statistics instruction: the well-known RStudio Integrated Development Environment for R, and its manipulate package in particular.